Tigs and wine in the land of the long white cloud…

Dear Tig readers

Here I am back in NZ! This country sparked my love for wine so I think it is appropriate to give my readers some bite-sized facts about NZ wine. (Sources and more detailed statistics at the end of the article; data are for 2012 unless otherwise stated.) For some easy to view charts click on links provided (and rather than the predictable wine pics I hope you enjoy my pics of the iconic Piha beach in Auckland and the airstrip in Wellington – scroll down.)

  • How many wineries are there in NZ?
    There were 703 wineries in 2012, three times more than in 1996.
  • What is the area of vineyards in NZ?
    In 2012 there were over 34,000 hectares of vines.

***See this chart showing the growth of vineyard area and wineries since the mid-1990s.***

  • What types of grapes are grown?
    Sauvignon blanc accounts for 58% of grapevines planted in NZ. The next three largest vine areas are for pinot noir (15%), chardonnay (9%) and pinot gris (7%). (See Table 1) The New Zealand Wines and Wineries website gives a great overview of characteristics of wine grape varieties specific to NZ – simple and clear and very informative.
  • Where are the grapes grown?
    Marlborough (66%), Hawke’s Bay (14%), Otago and Gisborne 5% each. (See Table 2)

***See this table for juicy details of wine grapes by region and variety.***

  • How much wine does NZ produce?
    In 2012 NZ produced 194 million litres of wine (down from the peak of 235 million litres in 2011).
  • Where are the wines sold?
    Sales of NZ wine by value in 2012 (NZ$mn; share of total): Australia (380; 32%), UK (284; 24%), USA (251; 21%), Canada (71; 6%).

***See this chart showing the growth of NZ wine export volume and value since the mid-1990s.***

Table 1: Areas of vines by grape variety, 2012

Grape variety

Hectares   of vines

Share of total (%)

Sauvignon blanc

19,930

58.2

Pinot noir

5,096

14.9

Chardonnay

3,121

9.1

Pinot gris

2,396

7.0

Merlot

1,196

3.5

Riesling

719

2.1

Syrah

354

1.0

Gewürztraminer

331

1.0

Cabernet   sauvignon

285

0.8

Table 2: Areas of vines in the main winegrowing regions of NZ, 2012

Region

Hectares of vines

Share of total (%)

Marlborough

22,587

65.9

Hawke’s Bay

4,841

14.1

Otago

1,787

5.2

Gisborne

1,617

4.7

Canterbury

1,197

3.5

Nelson

963

2.8

Wairarapa

942

2.7

Auckland

320

0.9

Sources:

Wines of NZ

NZ Winegrowers

Tigs with friend at Weta studios, Miramar, Wellington

Tigs with friend at Weta studios, Miramar, Wellington

Lion Rock and black sand at Piha Beach, Auckland

Lion Rock and black sand at Piha Beach, Auckland

Wellington air strip

Wellington air strip

Advertisements

About tigchandler

English-born, lived several years in Wellington, NZ, then in Adelaide, South Australia, and recently moved back to New Zealand. With an economics background, I have worked in researching wine consumption patterns, marketing, economics and social media at the University of Adelaide. I also worked a vintage and in wineries in McLaren Vale so have seen both the research/analytical side of the industry and the practical/hands-on side. I have retail experience and many ongoing industry links all around Australia and overseas. This blog reflects my ongoing passion for everything related to the wine industry.
This entry was posted in Chardonnay, Gewurztraminer, New World wine, NZ wine, Pinot noir, Sauvignon blanc and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Tigs and wine in the land of the long white cloud…

  1. Raymond Chan says:

    Hi Tigs – Great to see you back in New Zealand and in Wellington. We are richer for your presence! Nice view of Wellington airport runway… Cheers, Raymond

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s